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Do you look at cue ball or object ball

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The video above was something I started doing in the 90's. I posted this video five years ago that demonstrates perfectly how cueing is separate from potting.. The issue I see with a very high percentage of players who are struggling to get into regular 40 breaks, is that they are simply WAY too focused on 'potting the ball'. That is the purpose of snooker, right?! This sounds obvious, but to the subconscious mind who wants so desperately to pot the ball In all the drills below, the idea is to develop an appreciation of how you strike the cue ball in these drills, and how you hit the ball when an object ball is in the way.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 08. Aim Part 1

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Where Does The Cue Ball Go After You Hit The Object Ball (Revisit)

What Do We Look At? – A Pool Odyssey with Mark Finkelstein

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The following is a glossary of traditional English-language terms used in the three overarching cue sports disciplines: carom or carambole billiards referring to the various carom games played on a billiard table without pockets ; pool , which denotes a host of games played on a table with six pockets; and snooker , played on a large pocket table, and which has a sport culture unto itself distinct from pool. The term " billiards " is sometimes used to refer to all of the cue sports, to a specific class of them, or to specific ones such as English billiards; this article uses the term in its most generic sense unless otherwise noted.

However, due to the predominance of US-originating terminology in most internationally competitive pool as opposed to snooker , US terms are also common in the pool context in other countries in which English is at least a minority language, and US and borrowed French terms predominate in carom billiards. Similarly, British terms predominate in the world of snooker, English billiards and blackball, regardless of the players' nationalities.

The term "blackball" is used in this glossary to refer to both blackball and eight-ball pool as played in the Commonwealth, as a shorthand. Blackball was chosen because it is less ambiguous "eight-ball pool" is too easily confused with the related " eight-ball " , and blackball is globally standardized by an International Olympic Committee -recognized governing body , the World Pool-Billiard Association WPA ; meanwhile, its ancestor, eight-ball pool, is largely a folk game, like North American bar pool , and to the extent that its rules have been codified, they have been done so by competing authorities with different rulesets.

For the same reason, the glossary's information on eight-ball and nine-ball draws principally on the stable WPA rules, because there are many competing amateur leagues and even professional tours with divergent rules for these games. Foreign-language terms are generally not within the scope of this list, unless they have become an integral part of billiards terminology in English e.

Also apex ball , apex of the triangle , apex of the diamond or apex of the rack. Also backspin , back-spin , backward spin. Same as draw. See illustration at spin. Also balk space. Also balk line. Not always hyphenated.

Plural: balls-on. Also bar rules , pub pool , tavern pool. Also bar box , pub table , tavern table , coin-operated table , coin-op table. Also middle spot in baulk , baulk line spot , middle of the baulk-line spot , etc. Also bigs , big balls , big ones. Also billiard shot. Also the black. Also the blue s. Also shake bottle , pea bottle , pill bottle , tally bottle , kelly bottle. Also bottomspin , bottom-spin , bottom. Also called-safe. Also called-shot ; call-pocket or called-pocket.

Also carambola. Also coloured ball s , colour s ; American spelling color sometimes also used. In snooker , any of the object balls that are not reds. A colour ball must be potted after each red in the continuation of a break , and are re-spotted until the reds run out, after which the colours must be potted in their order:.

Also counting rack , counter ball rack , [11] : etc. Also dog it. Sometimes interchangeable with scratch , though the latter is often used only to refer to the foul of pocketing the cue ball. A violation of a particular game's rules for which a set penalty is imposed.

In many pool games the penalty for a foul is ball-in-hand anywhere on the table for the opponent. In some games such as straight pool, a foul results in a loss of one or more points. In one-pocket, in which a set number of balls must be made in a specific pocket, upon a foul the player must return a ball to the table.

In some games, three successive fouls in a row is a loss of game. In straight pool, a third successive foul results in a loss of 16 points 15 plus one for the foul. A situation where a player has fouled , leaving the opponent snookered. In addition, some variations of the game allow the player to pot one of the opposition's balls, on the first visit only, without the loss of a "free shot". Also rarely high-run , hi-run , highrun , etc.

Also littles , little ones , little balls. Also matchplay , match-play. Also nurse shot , nursery shot , nursery cannon. In carom games such as straight rail , balkline and cushion caroms , where all the balls are kept near each other and a cushion, so that with very soft shots the balls can be "nursed" down a rail, allowing multiple successful shots that effectively replicate the same ball setup so that the nurse shots can be continued almost indefinitely, unless a limit is imposed by the rules.

Depending on context:. Used when describing perfect play; a metaphoric reference to puppetry :. Also 1-on-1 , one on one , etc. Also pocket-speed. Also pro side of the pocket ; sometimes "of the pocket" is left off the phrase. The long-rail side of a corner pocket. To "aim for the profession side of the pocket" is to slightly overcut a difficult corner-pocket cut shot , to cheat the pocket , rather than undercutting , especially in nine-ball.

Erring too much in this direction is "missing on the professional side of the pocket. Also red s , the red s. Also rerack. Also respot. Usually set-up in non-verb form, sometimes setup in noun form particularly. Also pool shark , poolshark US ; sharp , pool sharp British. Also sidespin , side-spin , side. Also topspin , top-spin , top. Also treble century , triple-century break , treble-century break.

Also under-cut. Also the white. Also yellow s , the yellow s. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wikipedia glossary. This article uses HTML markup. For help finding or replacing the problematic tags, see instructions. February Play media. Main article: Baize. This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. December Main article: Century break. Main article: Crucible Curse. Main article: Cue stick. Main article: Double-elimination tournament.

Main article: Hustling. Further information: Irish linen. Main article: Maximum break. Further information: Cue sports techniques. Main article: Single elimination tournament. Further information: Rack billiards. Main article: Trick shot.

April The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Billiards. Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn, NY : 4. February 22, Archived from the original on Retrieved New York: Alpha Books. Various pages. Pocket Billiards with Cue Tips. Barnes and Co. A Pool Player's Journey.

How to Play Snooker

One of the things that is not mentioned too much when talking about the fundamentals of playing good pool is where to look. We have the cue ball, the pocket, the object ball and the location we want the cue ball to end up at to focus on. How do we organize our vision to make the most of what we are seeing?

Have you been trying to improve your billiards game? The ghost ball method for pool requires you to imagine the cue ball's position at impact along the line of centers--the cue ball pinned on the optimum line through the object ball that drives the target ball to the pocket. Most pool pros do not consciously use this method of aim!

This is a great topic for discussion! Of course, this is supposed to be an instructional article, not a thread on a forum. Well, I was just reading a thread of comments on the Main Forum on azbilliards. It started out with someone posting his results and conclusions after doing some experimenting with looking at the cue ball last, just before he shoots the cue ball.

Snooker Coaching – Striking the Ball

Login or Sign Up. Posts Latest Activity. Page of 2. Filtered by:. Previous 1 2 template Next. Tags: None. Tommy, while I hope senior players and coaches here would comment on that but what I can say is that its not how your friend has told you. You must always look at the potting angle on the object ball while sricking the cueball. If you get down on the shot in the address piosition directly on the line of aim then you should not worry about anything else. Looking at object ball upon strike is also good for improving potting concentration.

Applying spin to the cue ball

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. What should we be doing with our eyes as we shoot? The generally accepted wisdom here is that we should be looking at the object ball or rail target as we strike the CB.

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The following is a glossary of traditional English-language terms used in the three overarching cue sports disciplines: carom or carambole billiards referring to the various carom games played on a billiard table without pockets ; pool , which denotes a host of games played on a table with six pockets; and snooker , played on a large pocket table, and which has a sport culture unto itself distinct from pool. The term " billiards " is sometimes used to refer to all of the cue sports, to a specific class of them, or to specific ones such as English billiards; this article uses the term in its most generic sense unless otherwise noted. However, due to the predominance of US-originating terminology in most internationally competitive pool as opposed to snooker , US terms are also common in the pool context in other countries in which English is at least a minority language, and US and borrowed French terms predominate in carom billiards.

Cue Ball last or Object Ball last?

I was a high jumper in high school and college. Not a good one. Before I started competing I scissored about 5 feet. Com'on I was a kid for crying out loud.

Or perhaps you just fancy beating one of your cocky mates a little more than you currently do. The goal? To spread the balls out across the table and, preferably, pot one of them. You can then stay on the table and continue with your break. Fail to pot from the break and you allow your opponent in. Two things to consider — power and technique.

Struggling To Be Confident In Your Snooker Aiming & Snooker Potting?

You're welcome to join our Facebook group: Snooker. All you have to do now is pot balls! Knowing how to pot a ball is something you either have or you do not have. Of course practice can help but you really need an eye for it. When walking to the table after your opponent has missed it seems he has left you an easy pot on a straight red followed by an easier black. You get down and miss the red!

Oct 24, - Do you look at the cue ball or object ball when shooting? Do you look at the ball when you shoot? Vision: What to Look When You're Playing Pool.

Mark Forums Read. Do you look at the cue ball or object ball when shooting? Status: Offline. Ok, I thought everyone looked at the object ball until tonight.

In the last two weeks we have looked at both your stance and how to bridge correctly to provide the stability needed for more accurate shots. Now we can expand upon that and look at the procedure for striking the ball. There are two parts to this, first you need to sight the ball correctly to ensure you form your stance in the right place, then you need to deliver the cue in a smooth and straight line to give yourself the best possible chance of playing the intended shot. To line up a ball you need to place your leading leg in line with the cue ball and the object ball.

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Comments: 3
  1. Daigrel

    It is remarkable, very amusing piece

  2. Fek

    Yes, you have correctly told

  3. Fauzahn

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are mistaken. I can defend the position. Write to me in PM, we will discuss.

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