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Looking for girlfriend or boyfriend > Dating for life > Can a woman get hiv from precum

Can a woman get hiv from precum

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This article is also available in Simplified Chinese and Thai. Precum is what emerges when you are aroused. As the dick gets hard, out comes that familiar clear and often inconspicuous fluid known as precum. But what does precum do? Does it serve a purpose at all?

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: TMI Tuesday: Can you get pregnant from pre-cum?

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Confused about HIV transmission statistics

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The chances of HIV being passed from one person to another depend on the type of contact. HIV is most easily spread or transmitted through unprotected anal sex, unprotected vaginal sex, and sharing injection drug equipment. Unprotected sex means sex in which no condoms or other barriers are used. Recent research has shown that people living with HIV who take HIV drugs and whose viral load is undetectable too low to be found with standard tests cannot pass the virus on to their sexual partners even during unprotected sex.

That said, unprotected sex puts you at risk for other sexually transmitted infections. Oral sex involves contact between the mouth and the genitals. Under most circumstances, oral sex poses little to no risk of transmitting HIV.

Oral sex may not be risk-free, but it has been shown to be much less risky than anal or vaginal sex, or sharing needles. There is HIV virus in female sexual fluid vaginal secretions , male sexual fluids semen or ejaculate, also called "cum" and "pre-cum" , and blood.

HIV cannot be spread through saliva spit. One of these other fluids must be present, and there must be a way for the fluid to enter the HIV-negative person's bloodstream such as mouth sores or genital ulcers for HIV transmission to be possible.

It is possible to get other sexually transmitted infections or diseases STIs or STDs , such as syphilis, herpes, gonorrhea, and human papilloma virus HPV , through unprotected oral sex. Oral sex is a low-risk activity for HIV. The risk of HIV transmission through oral sex is greater if one of the partners has bleeding gums, mouth ulcers, gum disease, genital sores, and other sexually transmitted infections. Several reports suggest that in rare instances people have acquired HIV through oral sexual activity.

A number of studies have tried to figure out the exact level of risk that oral sex poses, but it can be difficult to get accurate information. When HIV is transmitted, it is difficult to tell if oral sex or another, more risky, sexual activity was responsible.

The take-home message is that oral sex may, under certain circumstances, carry a small but real risk of HIV transmission. While the risk of acquiring HIV through unprotected oral sex is lower than that of unprotected anal or vaginal sex, it is not risk-free. It is also important to remember that having bleeding gums, mouth ulcers, or gum disease and taking cum or menstrual blood in your mouth can make oral sex riskier.

If you would like to discuss these issues, see a sex educator or health care provider at your local AIDS service organization ASO or treatment center. To find an ASO in your area, click here. For services worldwide, please use aidsmap's e-atlas. Adapted from article written by LM Arnal. Join our community and become a member to find support and connect to other women living with HIV.

May 21, Get basic information about a variety of approaches to treating the metabolic changes that may result from living with HIV or taking HIV drugs. Lipodystrophy means abnormal fat changes.

This article addresses treatments for fat loss, or lipoatrophy. Get basic information about lipodystrophy: body shape changes, metabolic complications, and causes and treatment of fat loss and fat gain. Skip to main content. Print Save. Like like 1. Select the links below for additional material related to oral sex. National Health Service, UK. Oral Sex aidsmap. How to Have Oral Sex Avert. Oral Sex Coalition for Positive Sexuality. Just How Risky Is It?

Become a Member Join our community and become a member to find support and connect to other women living with HIV. Activity Popular Groups. Lipodystrophy and Body Changes. Where is the Love? TEDx : Vignan University, Interview : Her Story. Interview : News Webinar: Black Mothers Matter April 15, A Girl Like Me. My Story: Part One. I Forget to Cry. Depression - JoDha's Mind and Soul.

You might also like Women and HIV. Safer Sex. Do you get our newsletter? Sign up for our monthly Newsletter and get the latest info in your inbox. Newly diagnosed with HIV and not sure what to do? You are not alone.

Precum and HIV: Is It A Risk?

The chances of HIV being passed from one person to another depend on the type of contact. HIV is most easily spread or transmitted through unprotected anal sex, unprotected vaginal sex, and sharing injection drug equipment. Unprotected sex means sex in which no condoms or other barriers are used. Recent research has shown that people living with HIV who take HIV drugs and whose viral load is undetectable too low to be found with standard tests cannot pass the virus on to their sexual partners even during unprotected sex. That said, unprotected sex puts you at risk for other sexually transmitted infections.

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HIV: Sexual Transmission, Risk Factors, & Prevention

All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy. HIV is not transmitted though saliva, urine, feces, vomit, sweat, animals, bugs or the air. In the United States, sexual contact is the most common way that HIV is passed from person to person. This is because sex allows for the exchange of certain body fluids that have consistently been found to transmit HIV: blood, semen, rectal and vaginal secretions. HIV has also been found in extremely low, non-infectious amounts in other fluids saliva, tears and urine ; but no transmissions through these fluids have been reported to the CDC. Studies repeatedly show that certain sexual practices are associated with a higher risk of HIV transmission than others. The situations discussed below assume that the person living with HIV is not undetectable.

HIV Transmission and Risks

When it comes to contracting HIV, some acts are riskier than others. Here are the HIV transmission rates by type of exposure. It takes only one instance of exposure to become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. Here, approximately, are the odds of getting HIV , broken down by type of exposure — and how to reduce your risk.

Harm reduction during a pandemic.

In evaluating your risk, you tend to weigh and pros and cons as to which activities might be safer than others. At times, this can put you at higher rather than lower risk simply because "common sense" assumptions are not often right. While it may same reasonable to assume that less semen means less HIV, the facts don't always support the belief. The simple fact is that HIV present in both semen and pre-seminal fluid also known as pre-ejaculatory fluid or "pre-cum".

Sexual fluid

The virus is transmitted between partners when the fluids of one person come into contact with the blood stream of another person. This contact can occur from a cut or broken skin, or through the tissues of the vagina, rectum, foreskin, or the opening of the penis. Oral sex ranks very low on the list of ways HIV can be transmitted.

Contrary to some popular misconceptions , HIV is a difficult disease to obtain. Three conditions must be met for transmission to occur:. This is not true. In blood, for example, the virus is very concentrated. A small amount of blood is enough to infect someone. A much larger amount of other fluids would be needed for HIV transmission.

Pulling Out

Only five body fluids can contain enough HIV to infect someone: blood, semen including pre-cum , rectal fluid, vaginal fluid, and breast milk. HIV can only get passed when one of these fluids from a person with HIV gets into the bloodstream of another person—through broken skin, the opening of the penis or the wet linings of the body, such as the vagina, rectum, or foreskin. You can have sex with little or no risk of passing on or getting HIV. This is called safer sex. The only way to know for sure is to be tested.

Jul 31, - So going back to conditions required for transmission, HIV can be present, This makes a flat piece of latex that can be held over the woman's.

Skip to content. I have searched through your extensive HIV database it's a great resource , but I still have some questions. In one of the answers, you say: "A study published in in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at heterosexual mixed status couples. Of the couples that consistently used condoms, none of the HIV-negative partners were infected. Among the couples that did not consistently use condoms, 12 about 10 percent of the HIV-negative partners became infected.

HIV Risk Without Ejaculation During Sex

However the risk is extremely small. Read about one of the rare examples here. Risk factors include exposure to vaginal or other body fluids, blood from menstruation, or blood from damage sustained during rougher sex. Myth: Having gay bareback sex with someone who you know is HIV positive is the most dangerous thing you can do.

The Odds of Getting HIV, Ranked

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Can You Get HIV from Oral Sex?

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